April 13, 2024

Pathfinder News

redefining news

Tears, Fear And Fury In Kyiv After Russian Attacks

Lidiya Tikhovska peered past the crater left behind by the latest Russian missile to smash into Kyiv and pictured the charred remains of her son mangled in the scattered debris. The 83-year-old stood perfectly still in the afternoon sun and fixed her gaze on the twisted metal of cars and a green trolleybus scattered across the wide city street.

Her 58-year-old son had just nipped out to the local shop to get some food and basic supplies. And then the Russian missile blew in, the second of the day to fall on Ukraine’s increasingly besieged and traumatised capital. Her 58-year-old son had just nipped out to the local shop to get some food and basic supplies. And then the Russian missile blew in, the second of the day to fall on Ukraine’s increasingly besieged and traumatised capital.

The black hole in the ground looked big enough to swallow a car. But Tikhovska was only looking at the spot where an ambulance worker said her son Vitaliy’s remains lay behind the police tape.The black hole in the ground looked big enough to swallow a car. But Tikhovska was only looking at the spot where an ambulance worker said her son Vitaliy’s remains lay behind the police tape. “They say that he is too severely burned, that I won’t recognise him, but I still want to see him,” the elderly mother said.

Ferocious clashes on Kyiv’s northwestern edge are now accompanied by long-range missile strikes that killed at least two people and injured a dozen on Monday alone. A second front is also opening up across the wide-open industrial districts of Kyiv’s more remote northeast.

The growing sense of peril has forced armed volunteers who patrol Kyiv’s sandbagged checkpoints to start demanding ever-changing code words from passing cars. Soldiers are alternating the colour of the ribbons on their elbows and calves to better tell who is on the Ukrainian side and who might be a Russian saboteur. Yet this almost tangible state of paranoia on the city’s deserted streets is accompanied by strident defiance from many of the distraught victims of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s forces. “They killed my cat — now Putin is finished,” Oleg Sheremet spit out while picking through the debris from the day’s first attack a few blocks down the street.